Stock Up on Whole Foods While Still Staying on Budget

Whole Food (noun): any form of sustenance that is naturally grown or cured, has not been processed or refined, and contains no artificial ingredients.

In other words…what you should be eating.

“Gahhhh! But it’s too expensive,” you say. Ain’t nobody got time (or, let’s face it, money) for that. WRONG! Just because most of us can’t afford to actually shop at Whole Foods (uppercase “W”) doesn’t mean we ought to exclude ourselves from the whole foods (lowercase “w”) lifestyle. With a little resourcefulness, resolve, and sheer common sense, anybody can easily integrate an organic diet into their daily regimen.

That’s right, “au naturel” is no longer just a status symbol for the rich and famous. It’s for you and me. And our bodies will be ever so grateful. But…like…how do you follow a whole foods meal plan that leaves both your palate and wallet satisfied?

Glad you asked!


  • Fruits & Vegetables:
  1. Shop for produce at local farmers’ markets, which are typically cheaper than buying from a grocery store and almost always organically-grown.
  2. Try to only buy produce in-season, which retain nutrients longer and cost less than fruits or veggies that have been imported from other climates.
  3. Plant a backyard fruit, veggie, and herb garden, which will drastically cut down on spending and ensure that your produce is at the peak of freshness.
  • Meats & Proteins:
  1. Buy frozen poultry and fish, which saves a few dollars and has a longer shelf life than refrigerated meat (just make sure there are no added preservatives).
  2. Purchase meat in bulk directly from a farming source, which eliminates middleman mark-ups and often guarantees grass-fed or free-range quality.
  3. Look for alternatives to satisfy your protein needs, like eggs, yogurt, beans, or nuts, which are budget-friendly and often more wholesome than meat.
  • Grains & Carbohydrates:
  1. Make whole grain goods from scratch, which removes preservatives and cuts costs in half (homemade tortillas, granola, oatmeal, or bread saves at least $3 apiece).
  2. Shop at ethnic markets for large sacks of quinoa, brown rice, or other grains which is more economical than buying smaller often overpriced packages from the grocery store.

 

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